A wonderful, successful and memorable weekend in Stanford!

Hello Lindsay and Royd

How wonderful, successful and memorable our weekend in Stanford was. Thank you both for ALL you did to make our stay so special. Royd – you spent hours researching everything possible to add interest to Richard’s programme. Thank you for going the extra twenty miles! The club members have sent in so many notes thanking us, saying how varied and interesting it all was and commenting on your warm and generous hospitality.  Eagleyes was a fantastic venue. We were privileged to be the first people to use it!  (My apologies once again for the cracked bowl and the wobbly knife!)

I hope the Tourism people receive lots of amazing photos from our members.  I have a few and will send them in with Richard’s.

The weekend ended off with a relaxing and wonderful lunch on your stoep; thank you – it was just perfect!

Here is the photo you asked for – I hope you both approve!

Royd Frith with Penny van den Berg who worked for him in 1980

Royd Frith with Penny van den Berg who worked for him in 1980

Much love to you both

Joyce Goldschmidt

History of Eagleyes Guest House

We are still in the process of researching exactly when Eagleyes Guest House (34 Bezuidenhout Street) had been built. At this stage all we know is that it was built in the early 1900s by either Hendrik Vermeulen or his son, George. The Vermeulens were a well-known Stanford and Overberg family and builders of reknown. You can read more about them here: The Vermeulens of the Overberg

The house was most probably built for Mr Pieter Stephanus de Villiers, known as “Apie”, of the farm, Bovendrift near Stanford, or for his mother. Apie was a well-known businessman in Hermanus and Stanford. In 1951, six years after the death of his father, Abraham Pieter Matthys, Apie, his mother, Martha Cornelia Susanna, and unmarried sister, Martina Cornelia Susanna (Tienie), went to live at 34 Bezuidenhout Street. Tienie de Villiers outlived both her mother and brother, and in 1979 when she moved to the old-age home in Gansbaai, the house was sold. In a letter (postal stamp on envelope: 5 March 1979) to Tienie from her niece, Gerrie, in which her last municipal account was included, Gerrie also mentioned that a certain Mr Otto’s sister-in-law bought the house from a Mr Thys Erwee. Who this “Mr Otto’s sister-in-law” was, is still uncertain.

 

In 1983, 34 Bezuidenhout Street was bought from another Mr De Villiers by the Pieters family, and they lived there from 1983 to 2013.

 

In 2013 the house was bought by Royd and Lindsay Frith who fastidiously renovated it and brought it back to its former glory under the watchful eye of renowned local heritage architect, Maureen Wolters.

The finished product

The finished product